Human Boobytrap

[picapp align=”right” wrap=”true” link=”term=kandahar&iid=9651293″ src=”http://view3.picapp.com/pictures.photo/image/9651293/soldiers-investigate-the/soldiers-investigate-the.jpg?size=500&imageId=9651293″ width=”234″ height=”229″ /]An interesting little snippet from Afghanistan. This sort of ‘come on’ trap is pretty common (PIRA used them a lot in Ulster), but not sure I’ve heard of one using a suicide attacker laying in wait before. Presumably the white clothing referred to were martyr’s robes.

KANDAHAR, Afghanistan — The Afghan policeman shouldered his rocket-propelled grenade launcher one day in the first week of September and pointed it toward the police truck, a blue Ford Ranger pickup, and fired.

It was an easy shot, but the grenade missed, exploding in a tree nearby. A figure in a white robe fell out of the tree and the policemen ran, yelling they had seen a ghost.

The ghost promptly exploded; he was a suicide bomber, a human booby trap waiting for them to approach the police truck.

The truck had been stolen by a rogue policeman, after he drugged the dinner of seven of his comrades and then assassinated them while they were unconscious on Aug. 17. The Taliban later claimed the policeman was an insurgent agent. The truck had just been found during a clearing operation that had chased the Taliban from the District 6 neighborhood of the city and the adjoining suburban community of Mehlajat.

Lt. Col. John Voorhees recounts that story with a rueful laugh, both for what it says about the training of the Afghan police, and the ruthless nature of the fight now going on in neighborhoods and districts around Kandahar. Colonel Voorhees commands the U.S. Army’s 504th Military Police Battalion, responsible for security in Kandahar City. ‘I’ve found that the stranger the story in Afghanistan, the more likely it is to be true,’ says Capt. Bradley Rudy, one of his task force’s company commanders.

‘Afterwards we found a human jawbone,’ the colonel adds. ’ ‘See,’ we said, ‘it wasn’t a ghost.’

(Via .) At War blog, New York Times

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